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Benjamin Wood
Benjamin Wood

Best Rpg Games For Gbc ##VERIFIED##



What are its origins, and where does it stand today? Simply put, role-playing games are more than just a video game genre. They exist outside the virtual world, too, and they have for a long time. Here are the basics: players take on roles of fictional characters, assuming responsibility for performing tasks and maintaining duties as said character.




Best Rpg Games For Gbc



The popularity of RPGs increased tenfold, with role-playing games still playing a vital role (no pun intended) in console and handheld gaming well into the 21st century. The Game Boy Color is owed at least partial credit for this.


Ingeniously combining Intel 8080 and Zilog Z80 microprocessors into its own unique 8-bit processor, the success of the Game Boy Color helped the Game Boy product line reach nearly 120 million sales. (That makes it the third-best-selling video game system ever made.)


This small size and efficient portability is a large part of what made RPGs so popular on the Game Boy Color. Gamers could take their games with them wherever they went, allowing them to slip into their role-playing game environment on the bus, in the car, at home, on break, wherever.


From franchise entries to standalone hits, these Game Boy Color RPGs represent the very best the handheld console has to offer. Here are the seven absolute best Game Boy Color RPGs of all time. Read on to see where your favorites ranked.


Whilst both games are getting on quite a bit now, they're still extremely engaging and involving titles in which to drown your free time. The gameplay is simpler by modern standards, but there's still a wealth of intricacies and complexity to be explored if you want to train a team to pixel-powered perfection. If you were to drag everything about the game and dump it in a nice, shiny, new 3D engine you'd be forgiven for thinking these were brand-new games, and you can't say that about many titles from the 1990s. Pokémon Red and Blue are stone-cold RPG classics, for sure.


Known as SaGa 2: Hihou Densetsu in Japan, the second Final Fantasy Legend outing was much better received than its forerunner, especially in North America, where it was hailed as one of the best RPGs on the Game Boy. Like its predecessor, Final Fantasy Legend II is available on the Switch via Collection of SaGa Final Fantasy Legend. A remake for the Nintendo DS arrived in 2009, but it was never localised for western release.


This is a big adventure with plenty to keep players occupied. It looks good for a Game Boy Color title and features some decent (if sometimes repetitive) music, and there are a few features to set it apart from other games. It's by no means perfect and certainly has some issues, but Lufia: The Legend Returns is a solid entry in a series that really doesn't get enough attention these days.


With over 300 monsters to capture, Dragon Warrior Monsters 2 is a beast (sorry) of a game, and really builds on the good work seen in the original. Taking a leaf out of Pokémon's book, the game is available in two versions: Cobi's Journey and Tara's Adventure. While both titles are essentially identical in terms of story, they possess unique monsters and keys which are only present in that particular version. If you want the full experience then you'll need both games. The vast array of monsters on offer really does make this a fantastic RPG experience. Square Enix would remaster Dragon Warrior Monsters 2 for the Nintendo 3DS with Dragon Quest Monsters 2: Iru and Luca's Marvelous Mysterious Key, which included both versions rather than splitting them into two releases.


Whichever version you pick up, the original Pokémon titles remain an enjoyable gaming experience. Simple in appearance and lacking the bells and whistles of later games, they nevertheless engross from start to finish. Wireless link play is a welcome addition and attempting to "catch 'em all" and complete your Pokédex will keep you busy for some time. Compared to the other versions there are a few extras here; the splash of colour works well and the mini-game is a lot of fun.


Damien has over a decade of professional writing experience under his belt, as well as a repulsively hairy belly. Rumours that he turned down a role in The Hobbit to work on Nintendo Life are, to the best of our knowledge, completely and utterly unfounded.


And since unofficial translations like God Medicine were brought up, it bears giving a shoutout to Another Bible as well - while a rather distant cousin in the Shin Megami Tensei family, it's still one of the best and, let's face it, one of the precious few tactical JRPGs on Game Boy. And a rare JRPG I've ended up beating twice, actually.


Survival kids, this hidden gem from Konami really I liked a lot, really a survival game, that, though of it cute desing, its very cruel when you don't take seriously the topic of "survival", many game over I get it and never completed the real ending.I hope that a remake could appear, but, well, another game in my wish list of games that I would like to revivir today


Pokemon R/B/Y and G/S/C were what made the GB/C for me. I had a very hard time getting into GB games before Pokemon and thus always found it to not be all of that exciting of a system, but then Pokemon happened and I was addicted!


Also, the GBC version of Crystalis was NOT developed by SNK, but as one of the first games by Nintendo Software Technology, essentially the first American development team Nintendo set up (along with Bionic Commando: Elite Forces).


@MarcusIsCool Sadly there was a remake of both Dragon Warrior Monsters 1 and 2 for the 3DS, but for whatever reason they decided not to localize the games. So if you can speak Japanese you're good to go, otherwise you're out of luck. Also both versions of DWM2 were remade into one game.


@nhSnork To be fair, the GBC wasn't exactly a generational leap. It barely added anything beyond guaranteed full color, most GBC games are playable on a standard Game Boy (just without, you know, color), and the ones that aren't are few in number. It's only natural that the two systems be combined on most lists.


On the other hand, the individual cards themselves don't actually become any stronger like normal RPG party members, while overall it doesn't do that much more than many other card battling games like most "Yu-gi-oh!" games.


Backwards compatibility is somewhat common, yes, but the forwards compatibility that the Game Boy has with the majority of the games made for its colorized variant is an extremely rare feature if not entirely unique. Off hand, the only other thing I can think of in the history of electronics that has even a somewhat similar forwards compatibility feature is the ability of black-and-white TVs to show color analog broadcasts and tapes without the color. There may have also been silent movie projectors that could play early "talkies" without the sound, but that's about it.


This game is a must-play for fans of the series, as it neatly wraps up the story of the first two games. It also lets you choose between a male and female hero at the start of the game, which was new in DQ.


This version, also known as Quest: Fantasy Challenge, is more like something that you would have found on the games section of your Sky interactive back in the day and feels like a cross between Pac-Man and Mr Driller.


This is turn-based battling at its ver best. RPG fans and Pokemon lovers will love the feel of this game and instantly connect with it. It even boasts elemental weaknesses just like the Pokemon games too!


It might not be as intense as the PlayStation version, but Driver is still one of the best Gameboy Color games for the system. Many people were surprised with how the game turned out, enjoying the top down controls much more than they had anticipated.


Wacky Races was built with a 3D action engine, has power-ups, features vibrant worlds, and feels like a proper action-adventure racer. It certainly feels a lot crisper than the next title in our list of the best GameBoy Color games, but talking space rangers will always beat cavemen in my book.


So how does it all work? Players can make use of 125 different cards in this turn-based card-fighting game. Think of it as being a little bit like number 6 on our list of the best GameBoy Color games, but with a load of strange flying dudes instead.


The game does have some notable puzzles and quests that made critics get pretty excited, and Resident Evil Gaiden remains one of the best GameBoy Color games of all time for people who are a fan of the R.E franchise.


This game is similar to the N64 title in lots of ways and actually has the ability to connect up to the game using the Transfer Pak, one of the best Nintendo 64 accessories in our ultimate peripherals compendium! It allowed you to play with characters only found on the home-console version but on your portable powerhouse instead. How cool is that!


This was one of the first open-ended games that I can remember playing that allowed the player to progress at his or her own pace, meaning you could either leg it through the game or take your time to discover different possibilities of moving ahead.


The next series on our list of the best Gameboy Color games hardly needs any introduction. Metal Gear Solid is one of the best stealth/adventure hybrids of our time, and the GBC port finally gave Nintendo fans a piece of the PlayStation pie.


The thing that separates this title, however, is that you have to battle Johto leaders, you can collect Pokemon by winning battles, and it has remixed, upbeat versions of the music from the original Gold and Silver games to keep you pumped while racking up that high score.


The player can pick up armour upgrades along the way and obtain a different weapon upgrade each time they defeat a boss. The bosses and enemies are basically an amalgamation of all of the characters from the previous Mega Man games, so it provides a sense of nostalgia too for fans of the series.


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